Ascension Sunday
Sun­day, May 28, 9:00 AM
Pentecost
Sun­day, June 4, 9:00 AM
Sunday Worship Service
Sin­gle ser­vice at 9:00 AM
Sunday Worship Service
Sin­gle ser­vice at 9:00 AM
Ascen­sion Sunday
Pen­te­cost
Sun­day Wor­ship Service
Sun­day Wor­ship Service
Open Arms Chris­t­ian Preschool
The Eagle
Read this month’s newsletter.
Spring Congregation Meeting
Sun­day, April 30, 10:30 AM
Spring Yard Sale
Fri­day & Sat­ur­day April 28th & April 29th
The Eagle
Read this month’s newsletter.
The Eagle
Spring Con­gre­ga­tion Meeting
Spring Yard Sale
The Eagle
Sum­mer Ser­vant Event at Camp Restore Detroit

Sec­ond Sun­day of Easter (Year A)

The cru­ci­fied and risen Lord Jesus estab­lishes the min­istry of the Gospel in order to bestow His life-​giving Holy Spirit and His peace upon the Church. By the fruits of His cross, He replaces fear and doubt with peace and joy, giv­ing “repen­tance to Israel and for­give­ness of sins.” He calls us to believe that He is the Christ, the Son of God, that by such faith we “may have life in His name.” For “though you have not seen Him, you love Him,” and “you believe in Him and rejoice with joy that is inex­press­ible and filled with glory.

Guest preacher Pas­tor Paulson’s mes­sage (mp3)

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Easter Day (Year A)

Every Sun­day is the Lord’s day, the day of His res­ur­rec­tion, the day “after the Sab­bath, toward the dawn of the first day of the week.” In the Divine Ser­vice, the Church tran­scends the week of mor­tal cre­ation and enters an eter­nal “eighth day.”

On this day, the Lord Jesus, though He was was cru­ci­fied, rose as the first­born from the dead and the first­fruits of the new cre­ation. Because we have died with Him in Holy Bap­tism, we are raised with Him and our lives are “hid­den with Christ in God.” He has become our God, as surely as He is the God of all of Israel, and we are His peo­ple. “Every­one who believes in him receives for­give­ness of sins through His name.

As God anointed Jesus of Nazareth with the Holy Spirit and with power and raised Him on the third day, He also raised us up on the day of our bap­tism and poured out His Spirit on us. “This is the day that the Lord has made; let us rejoice and be glad in it.

Pas­tor Nettleton’s mes­sage (mp3)

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Good Fri­day (Year ABC)

Good Fri­day stands at the heart and cen­ter of the Holy Triduum (the “Great Three Days”) even as Christ’s death on the cross stands at the heart and cen­ter of the Chris­t­ian faith and life. Tonight’s ser­vice is marked by the Church’s deep­est humil­ity and most solemn rev­er­ence, for she gives her atten­tion to the cross and Pas­sion of her dear Lord and Sav­ior, Jesus Christ. Her sor­row and con­tri­tion do not give way to despair, how­ever; nor does she mourn the death of Christ. Rather, in repen­tant faith, the Church gives thanks for Christ’s aton­ing sac­ri­fice and lays hold of His redemp­tion in the hear­ing of His Gospel.

The “Order of Tene­brae” is an early Chris­t­ian order of wor­ship tra­di­tion­ally uti­lized in the obser­vance of Good Fri­day. Tene­brae is Latin for “dark­ness” or “in the shad­ows,” and the ser­vice is char­ac­ter­ized by the grad­ual removal of light from the sanc­tu­ary as the scrip­tural accounts approach the moment of the death of our Lord. As the last can­dle is extin­guished and the Paschal Can­dle removed, not­ing the death of the Sav­ior, a loud sound will be heard. This rep­re­sents that point in human his­tory when the tomb was closed. Fol­low­ing the silent prayer at the close of the ser­vice, we depart in silence as we retire to our homes in con­tem­pla­tion of the mean­ing of Christ’s death for us and in the cer­tain hope of the Easter vic­tory soon to be celebrated.

The Seven Words of Christ and Prayers (mp3)

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Maundy Thurs­day (Year ABC)

With night­fall our Lenten obser­vance comes to an end, and we gather with Chris­tians around the world to cel­e­brate the Triduum, or the “Three Days” of Jesus’ death and res­ur­rec­tion. Holy (Maundy) Thurs­day is a day of remem­brance, as we heed Jesus’ com­mand, or man­date, to “do this” — that is, cel­e­brate the holy meal of His body and blood — “in remem­brance of Me.” At the end of the ser­vice, the depth of Christ’s ser­vant­hood is demon­strated as the chan­cel is rev­er­ently stripped in prepa­ra­tion for the Church’s obser­vance of Jesus’ death on Good Fri­day. Today we begin our jour­ney through the three days of Christ’s Passover from death to life and from cap­tiv­ity to freedom.

Pas­tor Nettleton’s mes­sage (mp3)

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Palm Sun­day (Year ABC)

God had promised His peo­ple that He would send them a king in the line of David to rule them and save them. Jesus, Son of David, is the ful­fill­ment of this great prophecy, the king who will enter His heir’s city in triumph.

But this grand entrance is tem­pered by humil­ity. Jesus rides “sit­ting on a donkey’s colt” instead of a great war horse. He comes not to be lifted up onto a throne of power, but to be lifted up in glory on the cross. The power of God is love, which crescen­dos in the hum­ble obe­di­ence and vol­un­tary self-​sacrifice of the Son of God for the sal­va­tion of sinners.

God the Father “highly exalted Him and bestowed on Him the name that is above every name,” that He might reign over us in love with the for­give­ness of His Cross. The Church is thus called to “rejoice greatly.” The king comes with sal­va­tion, and “He shall speak peace to the nations.

Pas­tor Nettleton’s mes­sage (mp3)

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