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Good Shepherd Sunday (Year C)

Jesus Christ, the Son of God, came from the Father and became flesh among us in order to rescue us, His sheep. He laid down His life for us and took it up again in order to give us eternal life. By the preaching of His Gospel, He calls His sheep to Himself and keeps them with Him forever. They hear His voice and follow Him, and “no one is able to snatch them out of the Father’s hand.” The Good Shepherd gathers his flock in worship with all the company of heaven. Together we cry, “Salvation belongs to our God who sits on the throne, and to the Lamb!

Pastor Nettleton's message (mp3)

Download the bulletin (pdf)

Third Sunday of Easter (Year C)

Worthy is the Lamb who was slain,” who by His cross has conquered sin and death! This same Lord Jesus calls people of all nations to Himself by the Gospel. With His blood, He has ransomed all people. He restored Simon Peter to faith and life and commissioned him to feed His lambs and tend His sheep. Likewise, He revealed Himself to Saul of Tarsus and brought him to repentance, so that the persecutor of Jesus might instead carry and confess His name.

Pastor Nettleton's message (mp3)

Download the bulletin (pdf)

Second Sunday of Easter (Year C)

In Revelation we read the vision given John the Apostle of the Lord Jesus Christ, the incarnate Son of God, the Alpha and Omega, the First and the Last, the Living One, the firstborn of the dead. Jesus died for all people, and behold, He is alive forevermore! His death atoned for sin and conquered death, and in His resurrection He opened the kingdom of heaven to us. He calls us to believe, that by such faith we “may have life in His name.

Pastor Nettleton's message (mp3)

Download the bulletin (pdf)

Easter Day (Year B)

Today, we once again hear the story of Christ’s victory over death. We believe the glorious news that “He has risen! He is not here.” The women at Jesus’ tomb and the disciples heard this and were afraid and confused. It’s no wonder: Isaiah tells us that the entire fallen world is veiled in a shroud—as for a funeral—“spread over all nations” and “cast over all peoples.

But Christ’s crucified and risen body and blood are given and poured out for all people as “a feast of rich food, a feast of well-aged wine”—a feast we enter through Holy Baptism. In this sacrament we were buried with Jesus and raised up with Him dressed in a white robe of His perfect righteousness. The Lord of hosts, the incarnate Son, Jesus Christ, has defeated death, removing its terrible pall and swallowing it up forever. Now He wipes away the tears from our faces, and He invites us to “a href="https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Isaiah%2025:9&version=ESV">be glad and rejoice in His salvation.” “So we preach,” writes Paul, “and so you believed.” On this good news we stand, and by this gospel we are saved!

Pastor Nettleton's message (mp3)

Download the bulletin (Festival) (pdf)

Download the bulletin (Sunrise) (pdf)

Good Friday (Year ABC)

Good Friday stands at the heart and center of the Holy Triduum (the “Great Three Days”) even as Christ’s death on the cross stands at the heart and center of the Christian faith and life. Tonight’s service is marked by the Church’s deepest humility and most solemn reverence, for she gives her attention to the cross and Passion of her dear Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Her sorrow and contrition do not give way to despair, however; nor does she mourn the death of Christ. Rather, in repentant faith, the Church gives thanks for Christ’s atoning sacrifice and lays hold of His redemption in the hearing of His Gospel.

The “Order of Tenebrae” is an early Christian order of worship traditionally utilized in the observance of Good Friday. Tenebrae is Latin for “darkness” or “in the shadows,” and the service is characterized by the gradual removal of light from the sanctuary as the scriptural accounts approach the moment of the death of our Lord. As the last candle is extinguished and the Paschal Candle removed, noting the death of the Savior, a loud sound will be heard. This represents that point in human history when the tomb was closed. Following the silent prayer at the close of the service, we depart in silence as we retire to our homes in contemplation of the meaning of Christ’s death for us and in the certain hope of the Easter victory soon to be celebrated.

Download the bulletin (pdf)

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